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Red worms

Redworms Are More Than Just A Pretty Face!

Red wiggler worms (Eisenia fetida), or red worms as they are more commonly known, are important recyclers in the world of vermiculture, and make excellent red worms for composting. In fact, when it comes to recycling, redworms are one of natures best. They will eat most things that have lived and died. Feed them kitchen food scraps, leaves, grass clippings, or manure. Red worms are content both indoors and outdoors, provided they are protected.

As the red worms eat, they excrete tiny pellets called worm castings, a chemical-free nutrient-rich plant food that plants love. Why buy fertilizers? Let your composting redworms produce it for you.
Red Worms; The Wacky World of Worms
How Can Composting Redworms Help You?

They can save you time: add worms to an existing compost pile. Once the pile is well-established, you’ll have a constant supply of worms where you turn your compost-which can shave off a third of the time it normally takes to finish compost.

They can save you money: add worms directly to your garden along with plenty of organic mulch. Worms transform organic matter into free organic fertilizer.

They will recycle for you: if you raise rabbits, sheep, or horses, you have lots of manure to deal with. Instead of shoveling it over the back fence, let composting worms recycle those piles into an organic product that you can use or sell.

Everyone has left-over food that usually goes down the garbage disposal. That’s potential plant food, too. Feed those kitchen scraps to your redworms, and then feed your garden and houseplants with the free castings.
Worms Are One Of Nature’s Best Recyclers

Red Worms; The Wacky World of Worms

The worm’s role in nature is well-defined and beneficial to all creatures. That’s why we say they are more than just a pretty face! We hand-pick worms from the bins with TLC (tender loving care) to fill your order requests. We include 200 composting red wigglers as part of our Wacky Worm Recycling Bin. Or you may order worms separately below. Vermiculture; Our Worms
The Worms are here now what?